Featured Image -- 847

Can you dig it? Infrastructure and past archaeological mistakes

Dr Nick:

Ellie Dewdney highlights the how not to of infrastructure and archaeology…

Originally posted on National Trust Places:

In this series of blog posts Ellie Dewdney will be keeping you up to date with current issues that could affect Britain’s most special places and what the National Trust are doing to preserve these national treasures.

As discussed in the previous post ‘Can you dig it? Infrastructure and archaeology’ it is difficult to deny the fact that infrastructure projects can help reveal unexpected archaeological finds. But excavation is essentially a destructive process. Although objects and artefacts can often be removed from the ground they are still isolated from their original context.

The HS2 line has already proved a highly controversial prospect and this post looks into why, archaeologically, it could be considered as detrimental.

What a HS2 train could look like.

What a HS2 train could look like.

Past Mistakes

Hindsight is a powerful tool in this discussion. Certain other projects have failed to handle archaeological discoveries in an appropriate way.

If we return to…

View original 614 more words

Featured Image -- 839

Can you dig it? Infrastructure and archaeology

Dr Nick:

Ellie Dewdney takes us on a journey from a Wessex hilltop via a Peak District cave, and tunnels far and wide into the sometimes unexpected places that archaeologists find evidence that reveals the story of our past

Originally posted on National Trust Places:

In this series of blog posts Ellie Dewdney will be keeping you up to date with current issues that could affect Britain’s most special places and what the National Trust are doing to preserve these national treasures.

When it comes to archaeology it is an exciting time here at the Trust. To the delight of our team of archaeologists we have just purchased the vast Iron Age hill fort complex at Hambledon Hill, Dorset. It would probably be fair to describe this as the most important archaeological acquisition we have made in 30 years.

Part of the Hambledon Hill earthworks

Part of the Hambledon Hill earthworks

But is not all about purchasing power – our archaeologists like to get their hands dirty too. Earlier this year a team lead by the Trust’s Midland’s Archaeologist, Rachael Hall, found a hoard of 26 Roman and Late Iron Age coins in Reynard’s Kitchen Cave.

Reynard's Kitchen Cave

Reynard’s Kitchen Cave

Unsurprisingly, archaeology…

View original 561 more words

Discover Avebury!

If you’ve always fancied learning more about the Avebury landscape and are free next Wednesday you’re in luck. There are just a few places left on  my all day Discover Avebury! walk.

Discover the hidden story of the Avebury Landscape on Wednesday 20 August

Discover the hidden story of the Avebury Landscape on Wednesday 20 August

Our journey will take us from the Neolithic to the present day. Along the way we’ll  wend our way through the world’s largest prehistoric stone circle and the West Kennet Avenue, explore West Kennet Long Barrow and discover the secrets of Saxon and Medieval Avebury.

 We’ll be walking around 5 miles in total (about 3 1/2 in the morning and a more leisurely 1 1/2 miles in the afternoon). But we’ll break our journey by returning to the Old Farmyard for a delicious light lunch prepared by our Circles Café team. Tickets are priced at £30 (including lunch and parking) and booking is essential. To book call 01672 538 016. You can find out more on our Avebury events page.

I hope you can join me on our ramble through one of the world’s most extraordinary places…